Hello there. I am Terry and I am a full-time undergraduate based in Singapore. I take photos, write a blog and design websites.

And no, I'm not a teddy bear.

Pulau Ubin Photo Outing

Last Saturday the club I’ve joined earlier this month organized yet another fun-filled photo outing – this time, instead of heading to a place on the island state itself, we decided our destination will be Pulau Ubin1 (a.k.a. Ubin Island – Ubin: ‘ooooh-bean‘). For to event to be as meaningful and fruitful as possible, we contacted friends who are into photography as well and invited them to this outing. So I’ve managed to make Chankeet and Chongyen to join :D

The one and only group photo taken at the Pulau Ubin jetty.

The one and only group photo taken at the Pulau Ubin jetty.

This is the one and only group photo that we have – taken at the Pulau Ubin jetty shortly after arrival. There’s a total of 43 of us. No prize for finding where am I in the photo though – I’m the one wearing white in the front most row, next to Zoe who’s donned in peach.

Due to the amount of photos and narration, the rest of the story behind the photo outing has been tucked behind the jump. Check it out!

p/s: To give you a rough idea of the size of this entry, it has 48 photos with 5,300+ words. That’s almost twice the amount of words I sorely need to finish my academic writing course’s research paper *oooof*

Navigation

If you can’t make yourself to read through this entire entry, it’s okay! Simply select which section you want to read and proceed. Each section is annotated with the number of photos so you can approximate the length.

  1. Good morning! – 2 photos
  2. Travelling from Pasir Ris to Changi Village Jetty – 8 photos
  3. On the way to Pulau Ubin (Ubin Island) – 2 photos
  4. On the island proper – 14 photos
  5. At Chek Jawa – 15 photos
  6. Goodbye, Ubin! – 6 photos

The photos of the Ubin trip have been uploaded to my Flickr photostream too! You can check out the set, or my blog’s gallery.

If not, good luck! Grab some coffee and let’s get started.

Good morning!

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The day started very early for me – I slept at around 2am in the morning after returning from the trip to Singapore Flyer with Wendli after Claudia passed me two free passes to the F1 event. Thanks Claudia for the passes :) I’ll blog about that in another entry heh. Waking up at six in the morning proved to be a huge problem to me – simply wrestling myself out of bed and away from the alluring comfort underneath the sheets (I was thinking of using ‘between the sheets‘ but it sounded so darn wrong) took me fifteen minutes.

Got dressed and I grabbed my Lowepro SlingShot 200 and bolted out of the door. Rushed back into the room to fetch my tripod to my greatest dismay, scuttled up three flights of stairs and headed for the bus stop. I meet up with Yuenchin and Norman at the bus stop and made our way to Pioneer station. Along our way out of NTU, Yuenchin diligently texted every other members and friends living on campus whose bus stop was along the bus route so that we could board the same bus. When we were just about to get to know each other, the bus screeched to a stop at Pioneer station.

Met up with even more people around the Jurong / Boon Lay area at the Pioneer station concourse. We took the 8.20am train to Pasir Ris station where the meeting point was – which was, well, conveniently on the other side of the island, and 27 stations away from Pioneer.

Sunrise at Pioneer Station

Sunrise at Pioneer Station

The early morning sun and its glare poured in through the eastern opening of the station platform, silhouetting everything in front of me. This is the only photo that was not modified in any way in this post – what I did was only to resize the photo :) the colours are too lovely for me to work on!

Yuenchin and Ivan talking on the station platform.

Yuenchin and Ivan talking on the station platform.

As we waited for the train, we talked a little more. Thomas humorously noted that the size of our group so far at the station had already exceeded the attendance of the club’s previous photo outings. Wow, I can’t imagine how many participants will there be when we arrive at Pasir Ris station!

Travelling from Pasir Ris to Changi Village Jetty

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Many of us spent the train ride from Pioneer to Pasir Ris catching up our sleep debt – the rest engaged in conversations to kill time. I was half awake, listening to the blabbers most of the time but barely talking because I was too zonked to speak something intellectual, heh. Call me in a trace-like state throughout that one-hour journey across the island.

Do not grab the pole!

Do not grab the pole!

Waited for other participants to arrive. Chongyen as in the second train after mine (my bad for not making a wakeup call to wake you up) and a little while more Chankeet arrived as his dad gave him a ride from home. Lucky dude. We went around to gather some food for breakfast as Thomas and Zoe shuttled between mini groups around the station’s concourse to record the attendance. The station manager came out soon after, requesting us to leave the station and gather elsewhere in the most gentle and careful way I’ve ever seen because our ballooning group of 30+ was starting to obstruct normal pedestrian traffic. Ah, that just speaks volume of how huge that outing was!

We boarded bus 89 to make our way to the jetty at Changi Village. I’m still surprised how we managed to squeeze 30-odd people in an already half-full bus. I reluctantly got myself a seat during the ride when a lady alighted. I want to stand and talk! Sitting down makes it so hard for me to chime in on a conversation haha.

Zoe and that stare.

Zoe and that stare.

Yuenchin, our assistant honorary general secretary started giving out consent and indemity forms after we arrived at Changi Village. We wanted to make sure that each participant is voluntarily participating in our outing and we aren’t responsible for any loss, damages, injuries or death resulting from the outing. I reluctantly signed off the form – I know that I won’t need the form anyway. Just be safe :) Oh, and the photo above. That’s Zoe and the attendance list.

On the way to the jetty.

On the way to the jetty.

Chankeet and Chongyen became friends along the bus ride (they were chatting away as I shared my seat with another lady), and their conversation, while punctuated with Yuenchin’s calls for the signing of the forms, as well as Thomas and Zoe’s attendance taking, continued all the way to the jetty and extended till the rest of the day. Chongyen (left) and Chankeet (right) making their way to the jetty.

Francis, our beloved welfare officer!

Francis, our beloved welfare officer!

Many of us were still screaming hunger because all of us woke up very early to catch the earliest buses and trains to arrive at this remote (by Singapore standards) place of the island. Lucky for those who live in areas closer to the jetty! While members and other participants were given their sorely needed morning break, the main committee members stayed back for a short meeting.

On the left is Francis, our beloved welfare officer! He was put in charge of the boat trips, first aid kit and other miscellaneous preparations – two thumbs up for his effort! Without him the outing wouldn’t have worked out as we planned and everything would have been in shambles. Thank you Francis!

Wan Ting and her breakfast. Ohnomnomnom.

Wan Ting and her breakfast. Ohnomnomnom.

Slowly our members returned from their breakfast. Wan Ting was holding this Chinese finger food in her hand – basically it’s a biscuit filled with soft and sweet paste. She insisted that I took photo of the food in her hand and not her face. Not. Before she reacted I snapped away, and I think she looks good – well, at least I didn’t have to photoshop away biscuit crumbs on her mouth. She’s one clean eater.

That's Sam!

That's Sam!

Actually it was an unintentional effect. Rongliang was pointing at Sam (most probably telling him off for being such a big glutton early in the morning *laughs*). I was taking a photo of the scene when Rongliang’s finger poked its way into the scene, superimposing itself against Sam. Ahha, I love it!

Crossfire!

Crossfire!

A photo outing is not called one wtihout any incidencet of cross-firing. Basically when one starts to take photo of another photographer in the pack, the victim will immediately retaliate by taking photos of the instigator – and those around them would jump in the fun and take sides, participating in an almost never ending circuit of mutual photo taking.

We made our way from the food court after getting breakfast to the jetty. The bumboats at the jetty charges SGD2.50 for each person and will usually wait till they’re at full capacity before departing for Pulau Ubin. They charge an additional SGD2.00 for those bringing their own bicycles along. The trip to the island took around 15 minutes, which is pretty fast!

Shooting in unison at the jetty.

Shooting in unison at the jetty.

While we waited for our turn to board one of the bumboats, we took photos of others boarding. Chongyen, being a left hander, has an interesting vertical grip on his camera – I usually do it the other way round. When it was our turn, we didn’t manage to gathering 12 people just in time to board the boat so the boat guy (I know there’s a better word for that but I can’t remember it now) threw a mini tantrum demanding that we get our butt on the boat as soon as possible or he’s not going to ferry us over.

On the way to Pulau Ubin (Ubin Island)

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Unfazed by the poor anger management on a peaceful Saturday morning, we were all smiles while riding on the bumboat.

Group photo on the bumboat!

Group photo on the bumboat!

Yeap, that’s us! I was using a very huge aperture when this photo was taken and so not everyone is in focus. My bad! The ride wasn’t particulary bumpy so we actually moved around on the bumboat to get our photos taken.

Arriving at the Pulau Ubin jetty. A celebrity-like arrival?

Arriving at the Pulau Ubin jetty. A celebrity-like arrival?

Soon before we realize, we were arriving at the island’s jetty! Two bumboats load of photographer were unloaded before us so we kind of got a celebrity-like welcome from them – the constant clatter of the camera shutter tells us all. Finally, we’re on Pulau Ubin proper!

On the island proper

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So this is going to be the wordiest and longest part of the post. After all that hassle, we’ve finally set foot on the island and start our photo outing proper.

Bikes on display.

Bikes on display.

The entrance to Pulau Ubin was grand – they have this beautifully carved wooden arch greeting visitors arriving at the jetty and bidding goodbye to those who’ve spent a fruitful day on the island. We took a group photo there – yep, that’s the first photo in the post!

We separated ourselves into a few small groups – some went to rent bicycles while the rest of us chose to make our way to Chek Jawa2 by foot.

I picked the harder way, but I never regretted my choice.

We walked past the bicycle stores, and an uncle actually stopped us in our tracks and started a conversation with us. He ranted about how heavy rain flooded with bicycle shop – I cringed, letting out a soft whine and muted cry – and to the weather, the rustic feel of the island. Not wanting to be held back, we nodded furiously at his seemingly endless decries of government’s ways to urbanize the island. Finally we were let off the hook :P

Array of aluminium cans on display.

Array of aluminium cans on display.

Vendors on the island prey on forgetful people like me – who’ve very unfortunately left their water bottles elsewhere. The drink cans look so alluring – I swallowed a gulp of saliva. I moved on, unwilling to give in to the rather exorbitant prices – it’s around 30~40% more expensive compared to those I can get on the main island of Singapore.

Left turn ahead. Watch out!

Left turn ahead. Watch out!

Leaving the comfort of the little jetty town, we embarked on a journey on foot to Chek Jawa. The road was still paved with well-maintained tarmac winding between the twisted branches and forlorn, rusted fences. Signs like the one shown above tells us that although Pulau Ubin has resisted many developmental plans the government had for it in mind in the past decades, the government legislation still had a significant impact – which includes roads and pathways well demarcated with signs and boards.

The Stare!

The Stare!

Along the pathway, chartered vans ferrying visitors to Chek Jawa directly as well as those who prefer to travel on bicycles frequently whizzed past us. The people trailing behind our group (that’s me plus a few other photographers) will have to do the warning shout. Look out!

With so many photographers travelling in a pack, crossfiring became an inevitable subject. That’s Yong En giving me the stare as I took a candid photo of him and his tripod. Wow, lugging that heavy three-legged black beast around isn’t an easy thing.

On the way to Chek Jawa

On the way to Chek Jawa

Along the journey we self-assembled into small groups of 4 to 7, forming cliques that shoot together (and take part in that frequent crossfiring events). We talked about photography, discussed about techniques and asked about each other’s equipment. I had a great time imparting some of my limited knowledge to Chankeet (he’s new but doing awesome), and we even shared lenses because we’re both using Sony systems.

Zoe and Chankeet. Zoe gives that blank look.

Zoe and Chankeet. Zoe gives that blank look.

Outside a desolate house, a few cliques gathered to wait for each other. The old granny in the house came out to greet visitors as they enter her house, and surprise – she sells chilled canned drinks too! :) I didn’t dare to buy from her though because she stores them in a mouldy styrofoam box, but I think there are those who’re willing to fork out dollars to help her with her little business.

Thomas, Zoe and Sam coaxed other members to quicken their pace or else we won’t be able to make it to Chek Jawa by noon. We hastened our footsteps, navigating our way through the 3km trek through the Ubin Jungle to Chek Jawa.

Spider on the web. It's a trap - beautiful, amazing, delicate but yet lethal and deadly.

Spider on the web. It's a trap - beautiful, amazing, delicate but yet lethal and deadly.

I heard ooohs and aaahs from the people ahead. Looking into the general direction of the sighs of amazement and impression, I saw a group of photographer whipping out their cameras and were busily snapping away. As I approach them, I saw this big spider on the web, awaiting for prey. It was a pain to capture – I had to resort to manual focus. It took me around 8 shots to get the focus perfectly right *phew*

Crossfire with Thomas.

Crossfire with Thomas.

Thomas came out of no where and starting shooting me from behind. My instincts kicked in almost immediately. We started another round of crossfire with two amused spectators looking on.

Snip snap snip snap. Shutters fired off with a machine gun’s speed and accuracy.

Thanks to Thomas, I just decreased by shutter life3 by another good five counts.

The placid, napping dog. How lovely!

The placid, napping dog. How lovely!

Further down the road we were greeted with a cute canine resting by the side of the road, underneath the shades of the canopy above. Unfazed by the huge amount of attention it was getting, it only woke up to get rid of the flies bothering it. As our cameras snapped away, there it laid, placidly on the tarmac.

Whizzing past.

Whizzing past.

A bicycle whizzed past me as I took this photo. Slightly obsessed with arrays and patterns, I try to spot them whenever I go – and the reflective guide poles lining the side of the tarmac was a perfect scene. To the left was a village house with – surprise – solar panels, while to the right is a lovely hut manned by an old lady who sells ice cold canned drinks. With thirst almost too overwhelming to bear, I gave in.

Ice cold.

Ice cold.

I lifted to heavy lid of the refrigerator sitting at the porch of the hut. The lady behind the mosquite net asked if I wanted anything. I nodded.

Walking out of her comfortable hut, she gently lifted the lid of the refrigerator. A burst of colours greeted me and suddenly I realize that I need to make choices. Coke or 100 Plus, she asked.

I was thinking of jasmine tea.

Worried of being dehydrated towards the end of our trek and needing someone to haul me back, I picked up a bottle of 100 Plus.

Berapa? 4 I asked her.

One fifty. She gestured. Oh, she replied me in English. Undeterred, I replied, Terima kasih 5

No problem. That’s what she said. Haha! Maybe that was a very not subtle hint to me that I shouldn’t be conversing with her in Malay although she is one. Whoops.

Zoe enjoying her bottle of 100 Plus.

Zoe enjoying her bottle of 100 Plus.

A few others joined me in getting themselves rehydrated. Zoe grabbed a bottle of 100 Plus. One hand clumsily holding onto her dearest camera and tripod and the other onto the bottle.

Hello cutie pie!

Hello cutie pie!

A caucasian couple was bringing their cuddly little toddler out for a day on the island too! The sun is getting really warm and so dad poured some water, cupped it between his palms and wet the toddler’s hair. He squirmed a little in his seat, only to be reassured by dad’s apologies. We were taking photo of the family and mom was very kind – she even asked her baby to look into our direction. As he look at me he gave out a hearty laugh. I had no idea why – and I was so bemused that I forgot to take a photo of him gurgling at me.

Now this reminds me of a prickly issue that I always have to beat myself up with – photographing kids in public. Is it a yes or a no? Or does it lay in a grey region ill-defined by local laws and legislation? As far as what I can gather of from the Internet, photographing kids in public is not illegal and the parents have no right to ask you to delete the images. If they want to, ask them to get a warrant because deletion of photos is an intrusion on your personal property rights.

While having their baby photographed is perfectly fine with the couple above (thanks for being so nice anyway!), I have experienced a fair share to rejection, cursing, cussing and etc. from other parents. I remembered there was once at the Hort Park outing where a little boy on tricycle was quite close to us, so we started snapping away until dad stepped in and shouted furiously at us to stop photographing his child. While he didn’t ask us to delete our photos, I think he should be aware that one should expect some form of photography if you’re out in public.

For more information on photographer’s right, I have written an article on that issue before. You might want to read it up and make sure you know the rights you, as a photographer, are entitled to.

Further down the road, we were greeted with this eerie sight:

Sure Die (if you enter).

Sure Die (if you enter).

I wonder what is the message suppose to mean – is it just a work of a bored vandal, or a precaution of something that beholds if you do enter? I’m not sure. None of us dared to probe the dilapidated, barren and ruined house though. We moved on.

Soon after we left the house, the comfortable tarmac road we were walking on so far turned into a muddy path heavily eroded by constant vehicle movement. Cyclists stopped in their tracks and pushed their bikes up the hill, avoiding the bumpy ride. We followed the path and ended up climbing a 30m tall hill before descending again. We should’ve continued with the tarmac road, I thought. But the muddy path was the shortcut -  we couldn’t wait to get to Chek Jawa!

At Chek Jawa

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After almost three hours of trekking, we arrived at Chek Jawa visitor center. All of us heaved a sigh of relieft. We’re finally there!

The friendly security guard at the booth doubling as a tour guide.

The friendly security guard at the booth doubling as a tour guide.

The friendly security guard at the information booth doubled as a tour guide – he knew the wetlands like the back of his hands, rambling off a string of things we could do and places we could visit at Chek Jawa. Conveniently he also informed us of the location of the toilets – he must have known that many of us are desperate for a long-waited toilet break after so many hours of walking… without a proper toilet in sight.

Testing out the flash.

Testing out the flash.

We visited the Chek Jawa Visitor Center. Converted from a villa constructed in the 1930s, the visitor center held exhibitions of marine specimens as well as information panels introducing visitors to the fragile beauty of the wetlands.

It was kind of dark in the cottage and Chankeet was asking how would I deal with such a situation. I dug out my newly bought TTL flash and handed it to him.

Try this, I said. He fired away.

Overlooking the observation jetty outside the visitor center.

Overlooking the observation jetty outside the visitor center.

The cottage / visitor center had a breathtaking view of the sea. While lacking the dreamy white sandy beaches one would expect from a tropical island, the rocky shores gave us a different feeling of the seaside. Desolate, barren and stoic. A concrete jetty whose anchoring pillars were made to resemble wood (to mimick the natural living environment for sea organisms) extended out into the sea. Oh, that’s Chongyen in the photo. I am still amazing, till today, that how he managed to keep his white shoes perfectly clean during our trek through the dreadfully muddy path. He’s some ninja!

Black & White: The Jetty.

Black & White: The Jetty.

Here’s the breathtaking view that I was talking about – only to be rendered in black and white.

Underneath the blazing sun.

Underneath the blazing sun.

Underneath the hot sun, we took photos of ourselves sitting on the stone walls. I don’t have the photos with me now though – Zoe used her camera for the group photos, heh. We soon retreated to the cooling, dark embrace of the cottage. The little island on the center left of the photo is Pulau Sekudu or Sekudu Island6.

Thirsty Zieg at the vending machine.

Thirsty Zieg at the vending machine.

Exposure to the sun made us all thirsty again. A vending machine with overpriced drinks sat happily beside the information booth. Without any further consideration we just went for the drinks in there. Here’s my can of ice lemon tea while Zieg, in the background, gets his drink for the afternoon.

The observation tower.

The observation tower.

After enjoying a brief reprieve from the sun, we resumed our exploration of Chek Jawa. While we didn’t manage to visit the coastal broadwalk due to time limitations and that everyone was getting really exhausted from all the trekking, we managed to haul ourselves up the observation tower. We were treated with a panoramic view of the wetlands, the tropical jungle as well as the not-so-distant shores of Singapore and Malaysia.

Crossfire, again!

Crossfire, again!

Another crossfire.

Another crossfire.

Another round of crossfire was initiate again as we made our way to the top of the tower. Chankeet, Chongyen and I were travelling in threes to the top of the tower and so, the inevitable happened. We started shooting each other over and over again.

Chongyen was stealthy though. He stayed ahead of us and would surprise us as he peeked out from the corner of the staircase landing. Bah! I managed to catch up with him and on the photo to the left you can see him doing that trick again.

The elevated walkway above the swampy jungle grounds.

The elevated walkway above the swampy jungle grounds.

On our way up the observation tower.

On our way up the observation tower.

Along our way up the observation tower, we were greeted with a good view of the elevated walkway leading to the tower. The shades look so alluring, don’t they? I wish I could just lie on the planks and fall asleep underneath the shady trees :) the lush green foliage is just too torturing to look at!

At the top of the observation tower! Whew!

At the top of the observation tower! Whew!

After some climbing, we arrive at the top of the tower. I got some cold feet half way up the tower because that’s when the sway of the tower gets very obvious – afterall it’s a rigid metal structure meant to hold only 20, and it was almost full capacity when we went up, with another family making their way up the flights of stairs.

It felt incredibly hot up there because of the lack of shade. Sam jokingly theorized that it’s because the tower brought us closer to the sun. So what we did was to frequently climb down on flight of stairs to hide underneath the platform to avoid the sun for a little while.

Shoot me, shoot you.

Shoot me, shoot you.

Yet another crossfire with Chongyen. He asked me to freeze my position because he said he could see his own reflection in my lens. I couldn’t see mine in his though.

Hello from below!

Hello from below!

From the edges of the observation deck, our cameras hang precariously off our shoulders as we took photos of the people underneath the observation deck. And guess what – people down there were also snapping photos of us from below!

I forgot whose idea was it but someone suggested that the unfortunate people down there should form ‘PVS’ so that we can take an ‘arial’ shot of it. Ah, now that’s something smart that I didn’t think of at that time – I’d blame it on the cooked brain because of the sun.

PVS - Photo and Videographic Society

PVS - Photo and Videographic Society

So that’s our club – Photo and Videographic Society (PVS). There was a shortage of manpower (and nobody was willing to climb down 4 storeys anyway) so they had to use camera bags and tripods to substitute for real people.

Seeing that we’re running out of time, we chose not to continue with the coastal broadwalk and headed back to the gathering point instead. Francis called for three vans to pick us up so that we were spared the fate of having to walk all the way back to the jetty again. Chongyen fell asleep on the van and nearly fell off his seat when we hit a rough bump. Oh boy!

Goodbye, Ubin!

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After a tiring day on the island, it’s time for us the head home! We paid the driver for his service and headed to the jetty, waiting for the bumboats to fetch us back to the main island of Singapore.

Here comes our bumboat!

Here comes our bumboat!

Here comes our bumboat! We joyfully leaped onto it. With a stomach ravaged by hunger, we can’t wait to make our way back to have some good food. Chongyen was practically whining about how hungry he was since we arrived at Chek Jawa, haha!

A group photo on the bumboat.

A group photo on the bumboat.

From left: Zieg, Chock, Seokpeng, Adnan and Mervyn. All tired and weary but what makes us so happy is that we have a load of photos in our cameras now! The bumboat was slicing through the calm waters and the wind was strong. Finally we’re having some wind to cool us down.

The crank.

The crank.

The boatman skillfully navigated his way to the Changi Village jetty as we snapped away during our bumboat ride. The noise of the engine was a gentle murmur as he slowed down the boat during the approach. The jetty is just inside! And I know that means food ahead for starving Chongyen. Actually, I’m kind of famished too! What I had all morning was just a quick bite on a few pieces of biscuits, a bottle of 100 Plus and then another can of ice lemon tea.

The jetty is within sight. Hurray!

The jetty is within sight. Hurray!

Finally, the jetty is within sight. We started to pack up. All I had in mind when this photo was taken was “food! lunch! food! lunch!”.

Wearied, jaded, tired, exhausted, fatigued, limpy, feeble, worn out.

Wearied, jaded, tired, exhausted, fatigued, limpy, feeble, worn out.

That’s probably the limit of my vocabulary. Chongyen has it all on his face. Everyone is exhausted from the trip – but happy too! Finally, it’s time for our late lunch! We gathered at the food court close to the jetty and had lunch there.

Lunch time! Ohnomnomnom.

Lunch time! Ohnomnomnom.

Lunch was hilarous – I was sharing the table with Chongyen, Chock, Seokpeng and Agus. The two girls took photos of everyone posing with their food, complete with the double victory signs on both hands. They’re still incredibly enegertic and chatty even after the outing, woah.

The end!

I hope you’ve enjoyed the entry! I had a lot of fun writing it too – not only does it help me to reminiscence about this fantastic photo outing that I had with my club and friends, but it helped me to recall all the funny, insignificant, important, surprising events that occured along the way.

So, dear readers, have you been onto a photo outing with your friends? How was your experience?

  1. Pulau Ubin is a small island (10.19 km2) situated at the north east of Singapore, to the west of Pulau Tekong. Granite quarrying supported a few thousand settlers on Pulau Ubin in the 1960s, but only about a hundred villagers live there today. It is one of the last rural areas found in Singapore – Wikipedia
  2. Tanjong Chek Jawa (or Tanjung Chek Jawa or simply Chek Jawa) is a cape and the name of its 100-hectare wetlands located on the south-eastern tip of Pulau Ubin, an island off the north-eastern coast of the main island of Singapore. Chek Jawa is among the last few places left with a natural rocky shore. The wetlands are unique as several ecosystems can be observed in one area — sandy beach, rocky beach, seagrass lagoon, coral rubble, mangroves and coastal forest – Wikipedia
  3. A measure of the life expectancy of a camera. Over time, the camera’s shutter will suffer wear and tear and the loss of lubricating oils to allow smooth movements. The shutter will eventually fail. Most cameras have a shutter life expectancy of 50,000 to 150,000.
  4. Berapa – ‘How much/many’ in Malay.
  5. Terima kasih – ‘Thank you’ in Malay.
  6. Legend has it that Pulau Ubin was formed when three animals from Singapore (a frog, a pig and an elephant) challenged each other to a race to reach the shores of Johor. The animals that failed would turn to stone. All three came across many difficulties and were unable to reach the shores of Johor. Therefore, the elephant and pig together turned into Pulau Ubin whilst the frog became Pulau Sekudu or Frog Island – Wikipedia
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