Hello there. I am Terry and I am a full-time undergraduate based in Singapore. I take photos, write a blog and design websites.

And no, I'm not a teddy bear.

Infrared for your Monday blues – Genting Highlands

So here’s another Monday post featuring some of my infrared photography works – if you’re interested in the previous infrared photography post, click here. Hope your Monday was good!

Infrared photography captures the image of a scene using lights of near-infrared wavelengths – the camera sensor, or film, is sensitive to infrared light to a certain degree, but only for near-infrared (far-infrared has wavelengths that are too long to be detected). Typically, a digital camera manufacturer will place an infrared filter before the sensor to prevent infrared light from reaching it. To many people’s dismay (or is it ‘delight’?), some clothings are actually transparent in the infrared range – that’s one of the reasons why infrared filter is used. In addition, infrared will mess with the auto-focusing mechanism in the camera, and leave hotspots behind due to differential refractory index, causing the light to bounch off differently in your camera lenses.

One easy way to capture a scene in infrared light is to place a filter that removes light in the visible spectrum, and only permit small amount of red light from the visible range to pass through, alongside with infrared. Due to the presence of the infrared filter in your camera, high exposure time is required, even under bright daylight.

For the following photos, I’ve used a Hoya R72 filter (55mm in diameter) and screwed it onto my Sony A200 18-70mm kit lens. A hot spot in the center of the photo is somewhat visible originally, but this can be circumvented by some photoshopping skills. The photos are taken during my recent trip to Genting Highlands, a popular getaway destination in my country located just an hour’s drive away from the capital.

I have only selected a few nice ones to show – the rest can be seen in my flickr set, Genting Highlands, in a different light. You can also view my Infrared collection too.

Directions, please?

Directions, please?

An overhead road sign above the old route that people use to travel down the highland. Since the new pass opened, this road is now used to service the apartments and the police station. It’s now the road less travelled. I have no idea why the sign appeared orange though. Perhaps it’s the way it reflects infrared?

Go karts, in infrared

Go karts, in infrared

The Go Kart’s tack shot in infrared. The original photo shot in normal light can be found over here.

Flying Coaster, in infrared

Flying Coaster, in infrared

The Flying Coaster (what an unoriginal name IMHO) is the first of its kind in Asia, and the management boasts that more than a million people has rode on that thing. The amusement park wristband, while granting free entry to all rides in the amusement park, does not allow you to board the coaster for free – you will have to pay for the ticket, albeit at a discounted rate. Here’s the one shot in normal light.

Genting Highands, in infrared

Genting Highands, in infrared

A gorgeous view of some of the hotels in the highland resort, from an outcrop near the lakeside. This photo is taken further up the pedestrian bridge, see the other photo.

Corkscrew + Sunset = Awesomeness

Corkscrew + Sunset = Awesomeness

This is, without any doubt, my favourite infrared photo I’ve produced so far. There is little photoshopping done to this photo, except for artificially increasing the dynamic range and then color burning the sky a little for the dramatic effect. Everything else, including the lens flare, is real. The sun was setting rather quickly behind the roller coaster and I was on a final walk on the Dinasour Land hill before I retire to other parts of the amusement park. Grabbed my tripod and took around 10+ test shots, and this one turned out to be the best.

Are you involved in infrared photography too?

Just a question – if you’re also playing around with infrared photography, feel free to post links to your works and share some tips and ideas. I’ll be more than happy to list your work :)

You can also ask questions on how infrared photography is carried out, and I’ll try my very best to answer them. I’m currently working on a tutorial, but it’ll take a week or two before it’s done.

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