Hello there. I am Terry and I am a full-time undergraduate based in Singapore. I take photos, write a blog and design websites.

And no, I'm not a teddy bear.

Weekend getaway with my aunt

My aunt – a bubbly, hunmourous lady who has a deep passion for art and Bali-style architecture/products and backpacking (she went to Yunnan, China for a solo backpacking trip), also shares with me a penchant for earthy tones and Zen-esque designs. Last weekend on Mother’s Day, she brought me out for a trip to Central Market for an art exhibition, as well as a hiking trip to Gasing Hill (known as Bukit Gasing locally).

Art for Grabs, an art exhibition at Central Market

Visiting Central Market on a weekend gave me a different feeling than a previous trip to the same place on a weekday (Jeremy and I visited the place last Tuesday). The place was crwoded, tourists and locals swarming around the place hunting for souvenirs and artisic works. We headed right for the Central Market Annexe after asking a guard where the exhibition was held.

There was a photography exhibition on the second floor, where we lingered for awhile with my other aunt and my grandaunt. Love the portrait shots over there, and they remind me that I still need to get seriously started with portraiture photography. So far one year after getting a dSLR, I’ve only been shooting inanimate objects, landscape and architecture, very little about people in a personal approach.

On the third floor, we met Tako, a brilliant miniature model maker and artist. Today she wasn’t selling anything (just like my aunt, I love her lomo camera miniatures!) – I hoped that she would be because I can’t wait to grab some really lovely miniatures. With her friends, Tako set up a stall, thrid one from the main door in the crowded but peaceful (there was not pushing or shoving, surprise!) exhibition room, displaying a few sets of miniatures on the tables. Here are some of my favourite:

Miniature models by Tako - At the barber shop

Miniature models - At the barber shop

Miniature models by Tako - Table at a bakery shop

Miniature models - Table at a bakery shop

Miniature models by Tako - The Florist

Miniature models - The Florist

We settled for lunch at a Thai restaurant in Central Market. I love the ambience of the place – lime green (not neon green though, that would be weird) walls and ceilings, wooden chairs and tables and the dimmed down lighting.  The cutlery we were using seemed to be of really great quality, and my aunt and I love the tea spoon they used for the green tea we ordered. It’s slightly heavy, but not too tiring on the hands and feels different from other tea spoons I had at home. Four of us (my two aunts, grandaunt and myself) had fried tofu, tomyam soup, simple stir-fried vegetables and chicken. The restaurant serves one of the best Thai food I’ve ever tasted, especially the tofu! I’m not a person that really likes tofu but their tofu totally changed my mind – it didn’t have the heavy, sickly beancurd taste in it, and wasn’t oily at all.

Hiking at Gasing Hill

After lunch, we split – my other aunt and grandaunt headed home for the Sunday evening market while my aunt drove us to Gasing Hill for an evening hike. Gasing Hill is a gazetted area measuring around 280ha big, located between Kuala Lumpur (the Federal territory) and Petaling Jaya, a large suburban sprawl in Malaysia next to the city.

We travelling along the well-walked paths, so there was no way we could get lost in the jungle. Plus, there were quite a lot of hikers that day, taking a break from the tropical heat underneath the cooling, protective canopies of the prime forest. At the first 15 minutes we met this caucasian guy who was very friendly and greeted us with his cute cuddly beagle. Oh, I’ve always wanted a beagle!

Around 25 mintutes into hour hike, we came across this burnt patch of forest. It was out on the papers today (I wonder why it took so long for them to publish the article) – the fire was probably started by drug addicts who wanted a quickie in the middle of nowhere, equipped with candles, matches or lighters. Being totally irresponsible people, they started the fire which razed around 2ha of the reserve, around 1% of the total area. What a shame.

Walking through a burnt patch of the forest reserve.

Walking through a burnt patch of the forest reserve.

Further deep into the reserve, we came across this suspension bridge. Pretty cool eh? An interesting thing is that the bridge is just a 5 minute walk away from the nearest home and street. That’s because the reserve is actually surrounded by housing developments aproved by the government eager to expand the city in the expense of nature – they couldn’t be bothered with conservation.

On the suspension bridge.

On the suspension bridge.

So here it is, the photo of my aunt on the suspension bridge. The bridge was sturdier than I thought, so I kept my camera on my hands instead of stuffing it in the bag. It’s around 30 feet above the tiny stream below, not too low but not too high either – the Goldilock’s height, just nice!

A photo of yours truly, on the suspension bridge.

A photo of yours truly, on the suspension bridge.

Here’s a photo of yours truly on the bridge. Now that’s how I look (well, consider it a rare chance because I rarely reveal my face). I did airbrushed out a big zit on my nose, but other than not, it’s not photoshopped. I’m getting my braces tightened now, by the way. I’m changing the colour as well because it’s too hideous (partially, that’s the reason why I desaturated the photo).

We initially wanted to enjoy the moment after the hiking at the nearby A&W restaurant, sipping on their root beer, but we lost our way in the complicated web of roads and streets so in the end, we drove to my home and I made her a cup of iced Korean tea as a way to say thanks for the hiking trip :) she goes hiking on a weekly basis, so I’ll most probably be tagging along every Sunday then!

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