Hello there. I am Terry and I am a full-time undergraduate based in Singapore. I take photos, write a blog and design websites.

And no, I'm not a teddy bear.

KL photoshooting trip with Jeremy

Jeremy, a primary school ex-classmate of mine, and I have been discussing about a photoshooting trip when I return from Singapore for summer break. So we’ve decided to meet up at the KL Sentral station on Tuesday morning to start our journey though the hearts of Malaysia’s capital city, Kuala Lumpur. It has been seven to eight years since we last seen each other (since the last day of primary school, I reckon) and I was a little too excited and wee bit nervous the night before that I couldn’t sleep until 3am. When I thought I’ve lost all contact with my primary school friends, Jeremy is one of the first person that I actually made contact with – which brings me into a network of my primary school classmates.

Here’s a candid shot of Jeremy, taken during the trip.

This is Jeremy! Say hello ;)

This is Jeremy! Say hello ;)

Before I start, statistics first – I shot in both RAW and JPEG to keep the photos for future post-processing if needed. And the heavy bulky big-ass RAW files caused the total size of images taken during the trip to balloon up to a whooping 4.39gbs. 636 photos in total, and thanks to my being very selective, only a fraction of them will be posted here (but they’re still lovely!).

So, are you ready for the photoshooting trip? Photos are arranged in a chronological order, so it’s like revisiting the places I’ve been to that day in my footsteps, seeing with my eyes and all. This post is one of the longest I’ve ever typed – it took me four days to get it done, inclusive of the tedious selection and post-processing of photos. If you read through it from the start to the end, you’ll experience, see and feel what I’ve went through on that exact day. Enjoy! ;)

All of the photos are thumbnails to their larger versions – simply click on them to view the larger ones in the lightbox. There are several parts to this photo trip, each categorized under a heading. If you don’t want to read through the whole thing, you can selectively browse the content using the headers:

  1. Our first stop – Petaling Street
  2. En route to Central Market
  3. Moving on to Kuala Lumpur City Center (KLCC)
  4. Pavilion, our last stop
At the Subang Jaya railway station

At the Subang Jaya railway station

This railway station services my town, Subang Jaya. The train arrives at rather irregular intervals with unexpected cancellations and delays, so I’m smarter this time to bring books and my music player with me. The train arrived at around 10am, half an hour after I’ve arrived at the place. There’s this friendly, middle-aged man sitting beside me and we struck up a brief conversation before the train came.

I arrived at KL sentral right on time, around 10.25am when Jeremy arrived too! I messaged him to ask where he was and before he could send me a reply, I spotted him in his classy brown hat, white top and earthy-toned shorts. Sweet, my favourite colour scheme! I regretted wearing jeans for the day though – knowing that the tropical heat will be very unforgiving at this time of the year.

Our first stop – Petaling Street

We took a train to the Central Market station on the LRT line when Jeremy took out his so called ‘PDA’ – a photo of our graduating class in primary school wrapped carefully in the plastic sheet, complete with a wooden stick as the stylus. Haha! I LOLed so hard. He was giving me a brieifing on what has happened to our classmates and how are they doing now. It’s surprising that so many has changed so much, like the rather plump Amanda now looking like a real beauty and etc (no offense, Amanda haha).

We alighted at the station and walked over to Petaling Street1. Despite telling me that he had breakfast earlier in the morning, Jeremy still settled for a plate of barbequed pork (aka Char siu2) noodles. Before I could snap any photos of that dish that Jeremy said he will definitely have everytime he visits Chinatown, he gobbled it all up.

A scene at Chinatown

A scene at Chinatown

After his second round of breakfast, we walked around Petaling Street to talk some photos. The day was still early when we arrived – stall owners were still setting up their stores with their helpers coming in tows to move their goods. Clangings of the rusty metal display racks sliced through the silent morning air.

There’s quite a number of florists and fruit stalls along the way – something that really puzzles me because afterall, Petaling Street depends rather heavily on tourists (and their cha-chings), I’d expect to see more stalls selling *coughs* counterfeit *coughs* products like LV bags, Rolex watches and etc. Perhaps it’s still early. At 11.30am in the morning, only a handful of tourists were walking around taking photos and endulging in the atmosphere of the place. Local motorists and cars (the lanes were so narrow I wonder how they squeezed through) weaved carefully among pedestrians, blaring their horns more than too often.

The glowing blue rose

The glowing blue rose

The roads at Petaling Street were lined with stalls, complete with canopies that shelter their goods from the elements of the weather. As the sun filtered through tiny holes in the plastic canopy, a blue rose seemed to be glowing from the morning sun shining on it.

Heading skywards

Heading skywards

As we walked towards Guan Ti Temple, located within the vicinity of Petaling Street, there’s this towering skyscraper directly opposite the temple that caught my attention. I forgot what building is that, but the beige-coloured facade of the blocky building rising above the streets of Chinatown lined with low-rise buildings is an interesting sight. Glowing under the gorgeous Tuesday morning sunshine and shot against a big blue sky, this is one of my favourite architectural shot of the day (there’s more to follow, hint hint).

Jeremy and I turned left to the entrance of Guan Ti Temple. Three middle-aged, male beggars were at the entrance to the place – one is sprawled on the floor, the other two resting against the pillar at the entrance. I have mixed feelings for these people – while I generally ptiy those that are homeless and have to resort to begging to stay alive in today’s world, I am completely aware that many of them are in fact, physically capable of working. A visual check reveals that they have all four hands and feet, and are simply waiting for a good-hearted visitor to the temple to place some coins in their worn plastic cups. How on earth do they dare to feed on the sympathy of others visiting a holy, sacred place of worship?

Entering the temple, I switched over to my bokeh lens – a Konica Minolta f/1.7 50mm.

Oil lamps. To pray, to remember.

Oil lamps. To pray, to remember.

Here is a photo of the oil lamps in Guan Ti Temple. This photo is rather heavily post-processed in Photoshop to arrive at the desired effect that I wanted to portray. When one wishes to light an incense, he would proceed to the oil lamps to burn the tip such that the incense starts to smoulder. The oil in the lamps are refilled by the care-takers of the temple, who also perform other rites and riturals for visitors.

The very common ritual is one that involves you hitting a paper doll while screaming curses at it (it’s an interesting sight!) – it is a symbolic way to chase away bad luck may be potentially brought upon to one by his enemy. The caretakers of the temple will scribble some Chinese scriptures of your enemy that will supposedly make your life miserable. I do not quite subject myself to this kind of belief, but well, if a person wants to do it, so be it.

Burning incense in the temple

Burning incense in the temple

Burning incense in the temple left by visitors of the temple. Smokes are carried away by the winds. After praying to the stautes of the Gods and Goddesses, one will place the burning incense vertically into one or several designated pots across the temple. On days with heavy visitor flow, there pots are almost bursting with all the incense stuck onto it, and the huge amount of smoke produced creates this dreamy, cloud-like effect within the temple grounds. When sunlight filters through the smoke, the effect is even greater.

Back to our photoshooting trip, we left the temple after giving our prayers. A tall condominium (or is it an office building? I’m not sure) with a lovely sky garden and reflective windows glimmering in gorgeous blue looms above the tiny buildings along Petaling Street. If it’s repainted properly, it’ll look so darn good!

Skyscraper against the blue sky.

Skyscraper against the blue sky.

A Japanese tourist at the fruit stall

A Japanese tourist at the fruit stall

A Japanese tourist at the fruit stall, haggling with the stall owner in fluent American English for a better bargain on the good she’s purchasing from him. She was very polite, so do the stall holder – that brought a smile across my face.

En route to Central Market

Petaling Street is just a stone’s throw away from Central Market3, a place where talented artists gather and where art and handicrafts exhibitions are held almost on every weekend. If you’re an artsy person and happen to visit Malaysia, this is a place you wouldn’t want to miss.

Big bold red and a big bold NO.

Big bold red and a big bold NO.

Big bold red and a big bold NO. The sign screams for attention: Do not park your bikes here. Surprisingly, nobody really parked their bikes along this pavement, despite the fact that Malaysians are very good at bending the rules, heh. Oh, and that’s Jeremy on the left.

Press me for the green man. I know you don't care, heck.

Press me for the green man. I know you don't care, heck.

Buttons like this are rather obselete in Malaysia. People cross the road showing an almost complete, flagrant disregard of their safety, as well as road users’. Everyone is on a quick pace, nobody wants to wait. They’d press the button and then cross, without even waiting for the green man. They press it for fun, really.

Traditional wooden masks on sale in Central Market

Traditional wooden masks on sale in Central Market

At Central Market, we visited a camera shop to find that things are heavily overpriced. Then we walked pass this ‘fish spa’ where people dip their legs into a pond with plenty of fishes that feed on your dead skin – a few ladies were squealing as their feet get nibbled on while passerbys watch in amusement. Opposite the fish spa, there’s this shop selling traditional wooden masks, usually worn during traditional rituals and rites by the Iban tribes (I think).

They’re a little scary and intimidating though, so for the sake of those who are uncomfortable with it, I’ve placed a small thumbnail to the right and you can decide whether you want to view it large or not. User discretion should be exercised. When I took the photo I didn’t realize how spooky the masks are, but during post-processing I got a little spooked out by the photo displayed full screen in Photoshop, haha.

Moving on to the art gallery behind Central Market, Jeremy brought me to the top floor where there’s a gallery for art exhibitions. Since we went on a Tuesday, there weren’t any exhibitions around, so we went downstairs again, only to pass by this batik painting workshop which has many lovely patterns and artworks on display. There’s a group of kids trying out batik painting, and here’s one:

Batik painting

Batik painting

Making our way to the Masjid Jamek station, a lone taxi waits for passengers at the side of the road. Since it’s lunch time, the driver would most probably be expecting brisk business, but also be facing the prospects of being stuck in a nasty downtown rush hour traffic congestion. The main thoroughfare nearby has only 4 lanes of traffic split equally between two directions. Adding to the woes are the Puduraya bus terminal nearby. Desperate bus drivers weave in and out of traffic while motorcyclists squeeze between the tight spaces between lanes.

Taxi driver awaits brisk business during lunch hour

Taxi driver awaits brisk business during lunch hour

Oh, and nowadays little Malaysian taxis charge you by the meter. They will usually ask for your intended destination and then quote a price (which is around 2 to 3 times more expensive if the driver uses a meter), but the drivers have their own woes to face – the low fares by charging based on mileage and waiting time can barely help them make a living. It tarnishes the nation’s reputation as many black sheeps quote sky high prices, but it’s a largely accepted norm as we all understand that it’s not easy to make a living as a taxi driver. Many of them hold part time jobs elsewhere, usually directly after their working hours as a driver. Even the friendly taxi driver my family is acquianted with charge by quoting a reasonable price.

Dear government: Are you listening to the people's voices?

Dear government: Are you listening to the people's voices?

We walked pass this clock with a concrete base on our way to Masjid Jamek station. At the foot of the clock scribbled the words ‘F#%@ ISA’. ISA, also known as the Internal Security Act 19604, is a preventive detention law in force in Malaysia. There was a huge outrage over the detention of bloggers and journalists who mock the government over its allegedly corrupted ways many months ago, culminating sporaditc outbursts of anger from the general public in the form of riots and demonstrations. The police force did a hard crack down on the supposed ‘flamers’ behind the riots, detaining them under the ISA. In addition, bloggers and journalists who wrote about the detentions were also captured under the ISA, a blatant ignorance of basic human rights and the freedom of speech.

Warning: Strong language is depicted in the photo. User discretion is needed. Note to anybody (especially any Malaysian politician, minister and police officer) who is reading this, I am not here to further inflame the situation, but just to highlight the deep insatisfaction of the population towards the way the seemingly democratic government works.

We were all tired and exhausted around lunch time near a bank building, opposite to Masjid Jamek5. There’s a Burger King fast food restaurant nearby, but I’ve decided to head to KLCC first before finally settling for lunch. We took a 20 minute break sitting at the corridor, reminiscing our primary school years almost a decade (just 2 years shy) ago. Here’s Jeremy’s camera that he brought for the photoshooting trip – a Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX3, equipped with a gorgeous Leica lens.

The camera Jeremy used for the trip - a Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX3

The camera Jeremy used for the trip - a Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX3

Isn’t it such a beauty? Jeremy bought it because it has a Leica lens – and he’s all over Leica. His dream camera is a Leica M8, which costs a whooping MYR20,000. What a bomb! So he settled for DMC-LX3, which has a Leica lens and a lot more affordable. Good for you! :)

Masjid Jamek in infrared.

Masjid Jamek in infrared.

A photo of Masjid Jamek with Gombak River in the foreground, shot in infrared. This is the first infrared photo shot during the trip because I was simply too laze to switch filters and to set up the tripod. The concrete barriers along the river gave me a flat surface to stabilize my camera, so I seized the change to use my IR filter for this shot. I know that one of the spires of the mosque is beyond view – I wish I had time for another shot.

Moving on to Kuala Lumpur City Center (KLCC)

At Masjid Jamek station, we stumbled upon a hyperactive worker returning from lunch, dragging his shy colleague along asking us to take a photo of time. Exhausted from the heat, I didn’t budge but Jeremy took a photo of them. I’ll share a link to the photo when Jeremy posts the photo of that hilarious moment.

Arriving at Suria KLCC’s central podium, the roof is one amazing thing to look at, as well as the futuristic elevator shafts. Here are some photos of them:

The roof of the central podium at Suria KLCC and the elevator shafts.

The roof of the central podium at Suria KLCC and the elevator shafts.

Radial patterns of the Suria KLCC rooftop.

Radial patterns of the Suria KLCC rooftop.

An iPhone advertisement in the underpass.

An iPhone advertisement in the underpass.

We decided to head over to the KLCC park to take more photos, which brings us to the underpass connecting the convention center and the shopping complex. There’s this big-ass iPhone advertisement in the underpass. Maxis, the only carrier in Malaysia that is allowed to sell the iPhone, has embarked on a million-dollar advertising campaign to introduce the tech toy to locals.

A serene scene in the KLCC park, in the midst of the hustle and bustle of Kuala Lumpur.

A serene scene in the KLCC park, in the midst of the hustle and bustle of Kuala Lumpur.

It was a very warm afternoon, temperatures hitting 36 to 38 degrees Celcius. The trees in the park provided ample shade for us, while the scattered shelters and benches provided quick relief from the damning heat of the tropical sun for the gardeners, cleaners and visitors alike. Here we have a serene view of the city in the middle of the bustling city (KLCC didn’t get its name for nothing).

Petronas Twin Tower from the park, shot in infrared.

Petronas Twin Tower from the park, shot in infrared.

The sun was unforgiving, and to make things worse, angled wrongly at the time such that shooting the twin towers from the park, photographers will be greeting with a nasty flare from the sun. I’m surprised that this infrared turned out to be better (or less worse, haha) than expected. The glare is seen to be yellow in this photo.

Traders Hotel - one shot in infrared (top), the other shot in normal colour (bottom)

Traders Hotel - one shot in infrared (top), the other shot in normal colour (bottom)

Traders Hotel is located directly opposite of the Petronas Twin Towers6, right across the KLCC park7. The bar at the top floor offers fantastic view of the twin tower, so if you do drop by Kuala Lumpur, you can visit the bar at night when the lights are all up. The top photo is shot in the IR range using the Hoya R72 filter (see the original IR photo), while the bottom one is shot in the normal colour range (see the original colour photo).

View of one of the towers against the sky.

View of one of the towers against the sky.

Here is the photo of one of the towers, shot against the blue sky. The clouds soon came rolling in, which soon obscured the blue sky, what a shame. Jeremy and I walked through the empty and huge playgrounds, which are usually jam-packed with toddlers, kids and parents on weekends.

The metallic whale, midtown greenery and skyscrapers.

The metallic whale, midtown greenery and skyscrapers.

This photo is so nice that I had to display it in full size (in case you haven’t noticed, almost all the portrait shots are displayed as tiny little thumbnails to save space). I don’t remember seeing this sculpture when I visited the same park almost a decade ago with my family. There it stood, solemn, lonely and yet elegant and beautiful, on the surface of the lake in a park devoid of people. An unusual combination of a metallic sculpture of a whale, lush green trees from the KLCC park and the skyscrapers looming above the trees beyond.

Metallic whale sculpture, lake and park in the middle of a big city, in infrared.

Metallic whale sculpture, lake and park in the middle of a big city, in infrared.

Here is an infrared shot of the same scene, just that the camera is oriented horizontally on a tripod. This is one of the most beautiful scene I’ve ever taken in infrared, IMHO. The ripples on the lake surface have been evened out by the long shutter speed, the clouds were all blurry because of the same effect but the sculpture remains stoic and still on the lake, overlooking the lush green trees and the buildings behind. There was a group of people behind us but there were none in front of us – creating this eerily unpopulated surreal scene in mid-day Kuala Lumpur.

KL Tower from the KLCC Park

KL Tower from the KLCC Park

This is the Kuala Lumpur Tower8 viewed from the KLCC park. Also shot in infrared, the photo shows KL tower looming above the trees and among other skyscrapers. I took a coloured photo alongside with the IR photo, but the sun was so bright that it rendered really harsh shadows on the normal colour photo. Luckily there’s an IR photo to back things up, heh.

The Exxon Mobil Building and the Traders Hotel from KLCC park.

The Exxon Mobil Building and the Traders Hotel from KLCC park.

From Lake Symphony (equipped with fountains) in front of KLCC, we have a gorgeous view of the Exxon Mobil Building (on the left) and Traders Hotel (on the right). The top photo is taken in the infrared range (see original photo) while the bottom is taken in normal colours (see original photo).

KLCC Symphony Lake Panorama

KLCC Symphony Lake Panorama

A panorama taken from a vantage point of a service building beside Lake Symphony. Four photos are taken in total, stitched together using AutoStitch and then post-processed in Photoshop. Here’s a visual gimmick – if you pay attention to the bottom left corner, you’ll see two caucasians sun-bathing. A security guard later came grumbling, whining to a cleaner/gardener nearby and then shouted for the girl to cover herself up – afterall, she’s in a Muslim country that’s getting increasingly conservative (like a car put in reverse).

Lake Symphony in its full glory.

Lake Symphony in its full glory.

Lake Symphony has fountains that resemble that of jumping fountains – just on a way larger scale. A large fountain was turned on in the middle of the lake, shooting water up to 42 meters high into the air.

Panorama of the plaza in front of Suria KLCC, facing Symphony Lake

Panorama of the plaza in front of Suria KLCC, facing Symphony Lake

Finally, a colour photo! Here’s another panorama – stitched from four photos taken from the plaza in front of Suria KLCC, facing Symphony Lake. There were a group of kids resting at the steps behind me. When I barely finished taking photos, this foreign couple tugged Jeremy and asked him to take ‘professiona’ photos of them with Symphony Lake as the backdrop. Haha, they thought we were professional photographers! The world is so small that we bumped into them again, about an hour after this.

Jeremy taking photos for a tourist couple.

Jeremy taking photos for a tourist couple.

The ripoff lunch at Suria KLCC food court.

The ripoff lunch at Suria KLCC food court.

Here’s the super helpful Jeremy, helping a tourist couple to take a photo of them with Symphony Lake as the backdrop. After that, we headed to the food court for lunch. I knew that being a place swarming with tourists, the food and beverages there are definitely overpriced but I didn’t know it can get so darn outrageous.

The ripoff lunch at Suria KLCC food court – it costs me a whooping MYR10.50! A bowl of noodles in my neighbourhood is priced at a meazly MYR3.00, about 3 times cheaper. Meh. For three times the price of a normal meal, I get a plate of rather unappetizing rice – dry, overcooked vegetables, completely unsavoury sweet and sour chicken (disguised as pork, which I have totally no idea until I sunk my teeth into it) and a miserably small piece of omelette.

Jeremy pouring ketchup on his Big Mac.

Jeremy pouring ketchup on his Big Mac.

Jeremy made the right choice, settling for something more appetizing that what I had before my eyes. He got a Big Mac meal, a dollar cheaper than mine and looking a thousand times more delicious than mine. I could only stare at him taking big huge bites out of the burger. He gladly shared some of his fries with me though, thanks! At least they made my meal a little less worse.

We walked around Suria KLCC around, and even walked past the Louis Vuitton store poking fun that the doorman (sorry dude). We decided to drop by Pavilion, a shopping mall located within walking distance of KLCC and near to the station where we will take a train back to KL Sentral and go our own ways back home.

Pavilion, our last stop

Taxi stand in downtown.

Taxi stand in downtown.

A photo of a taxi stand in downtown Kuala Lumpur. We were already somewhere near Pavilion at this point. Jeremy told me that the last time he tried to take photos in Pavilion, the security guard actually stopped him from doing so. I would like to highlight this event that took place a few months ago because  it is not illegal to take photos in a private area as long as it is open to public access, e.g. shopping malls, zoos (this is a very good example) and etc. Policies are never above the law and they are on no ground to bar one from photographing the interior of a shopping mall. Screw those guards – shove this in their face next time they try to stop you from photographing. For more details on what rights you are entitled to as a photographer, you can read this article.

The interior of Pavilion

The interior of Pavilion

Dear management of the Pavilion mall, don’t think that just because you have branded concept stores as your tenants that you have all the right on earth to stop anyone from photography. If you want to ban it, sure, go ahead and close your mall from public access.

Because of all the possible complications arising from photography, Jeremy and I actually had to dodge several guards before being able to photograph freely. This is absolute bullocks, something that a photographer shouldn’t have do to in public as there’s nothing wrong with it. It’s not as if taking photos of the interior will affect your business in one way or another, right?

We headed for a camera shop on the ground floor where Jeremy spotted his favourite Lieca M8 model, selling at MYR20,000. My jaw dropped with a thud, I reckon! It costs a bomb, but so far after checking all the reviews online, the price justifies the camera. Afterall, Leica is an excellent, vintage brand that has gathered a huge loyal fan base over its many years of existence.

At the crossroads, a busy intersection in Kuala Lumpur.

At the crossroads, a busy intersection in Kuala Lumpur.

I forgot the name of this intersection, but it’s just a stone’s throw away from the Bukit Bintang LRT Station. It is famous for the billboards put up on the other side of the intersection (not in photo) which greets the commuters on the KL monorail.

We were crossing the road from Isetan in Lot 10 to the monorail station when this salesman (or I would call him later, scammer or con artist) tried to get us into this stupid lucky draw thing. Jeremy won a ticket and the scam started… which I will write in a separate entry. I guess at this point you just can’t wait to get this post done with, heh.

At the Bukit Nanas Monorail Station.

At the Bukit Nanas Monorail Station.

Jeremy and I were so excited that we managed to screw up the loser’s attempt to scam money out of us that we took the train heading for the wrong direction. We alighted at Bukit Nanas station and took the train heaidng towards KL Sentral. We arrived at KL Sentral around 5pm in the evening, when Jeremy’s Rawang-bound train arrived as he scooted down the stairs. Soon after, to my horror the announcement of the Port Klang-bound train (the one I should be taking) was cancelled – and the next train was due to arrive in 30 minutes, just in time for the evening crowd as many people starts to leave their offices around 5.30pm to catch the train home.

The end!

That’s the end of my photoshooting trip! Have a great weekend, folks!

  1. Petaling Street is a Chinatown located in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It is infamous for pirated clothes and accessories along with bootleg DVDs and CDs. Haggling is a common sight here and the place is usually crowded with locals as well as tourists – Wikipedia
  2. Char siu (also spelled cha siu, chashao, and char siew), otherwise known as barbecued pork in China or Chinese barbecued/roast pork outside China, is a popular way to prepare pork in Cantonese cuisine. The term literally means “fork burn/roast” after the traditional cooking method for the dish: long strips of seasoned boneless pork are skewered with long forks and placed in a covered oven or over a fire – Wikipedia.
  3. Located along Jalan Hang Kasturi, a few minutes away from Petaling Street, Central Market which was built in 1888 was originally a wet market. It has since been classified as a Heritage Site by the Malaysian Heritage Society and it is now a landmark for Malaysian culture and heritage – Wikipedia.
  4. The legislation was enacted by Malaysian politicians after the country gained independence from Britain in 1957. In essence, it allows for the arrest of any person without the need for trial in certain defined circumstances. Malaysia is one of the few countries in the world whose Constitution allows for preventive detention during peacetime without safeguards that elsewhere are understood to be basic requirements for protecting fundamental human rights – Wikipedia
  5. Masjid Jamek is one of the oldest mosques in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It is located at the confluence of the Klang and Gombak River and was designed by Arthur Benison Hubback – Wikipedia
  6. The Petronas Twin Towers (also known as the Petronas Towers or just Twin Towers), in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia are twin towers and were the world’s tallest buildings, before being surpassed by Taipei 101 – Wikipedia.
  7. KLCC Park is a public park located in the vicinity of KLCC, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The park has been design to provide greenery to Petronas Twin Towers and areas surrounding it. Designed by the late Roberto Burle Marx, it is said that it is a last work done by the Brazilian architect. It is said when he design the park, he has only one desire which is to “leave the world a little more sensitive and a little more educated to the importance of nature” – Wikipedia.
  8. The Kuala Lumpur Tower (officially known as Menara Kuala Lumpur; referred later as KL Tower) is a tall tower located in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and was built in 1995. It is used for communication purposes and features an antenna that reaches 421 m (1,381 ft), which currently makes it the fifth tallest tower in the world – Wikipedia.
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